Tag Archives: science class

Day 69: Adolescents are just as smart as adults (in some ways)

A lot of Earth-saving has to do with understanding the psychology of people and how to reach them better. It’s not about what you present to people, it’s how you do it – just like what you say isn’t as important as the tone of voice you say it with. Here, I’ll explain why I think adolescents are just as smart as adults. (All the information about brain development was gleaned from Steinberg, full reference below).   Continue reading

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Day 63: The Carbon Cycle (Part 1)

The most powerful way to learn something isn’t to read it in a paper somewhere – it’s to actually do it. That’s why I love teaching – there’s a lot I get out of it for my own learning. Often the best way to teach something is to let the students arrive at their own conclusions and construct their own knowledge. That’s why today, instead of explaining something, I’m presenting the carbon cycle and (hopefully) letting people arrive at their own conclusions. Continue reading

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Day 34: Talking about the African water crisis with children

ALongWalkToWater.jpg

Source: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/p/linda-sue-park/long-walk-to-water.htm

One of the children I work with told me that he had recently read “A Long Walk to Water“, by Linda Sue Park. I have not yet read this book,  but by seeing the reaction this book had on this kid, I would personally endorse it (Goodreads judges it suitable for ages 10 and up). The message that this book conveys is so powerful that the reaction it drew has already lasted for several days and has spurred a considerable amount of reflection. Continue reading

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Day 33: The dangers of sugarcoating the world for children

We do our best so that children grow up with a positive sense of self and their environment. Nobody wants to terrorize children by revealing all the horrors there are on Earth, making them scared or depressed. We want our children to believe that the world is safe and welcoming place where their dreams can come true. Continue reading

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Day 32: A little bit of star wonder – understanding parallax

How do scientists know that stars are so far, far away? Here’s a little bit of wonder explained and a lit of bit of cool science appreciation – thank you scientists for coming up with theories and information that knocks our socks off! Continue reading

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Day 27: Have a telescope party!

pia00405-orig

Source: NASA. “NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin.” http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

For this action on saving the world, you will need:

  • A telescope
  • A front-yard with at least a partial view of the sky (even a light-polluted sky will work)
  • A clear night
  • Curious neighbors

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Day 26: Teaching kids to love the Earth

 

My lovely bf gave me this model of our solar system (the sun lights up and the planets move in orbit). I’m showing it to kids for the first time tomorrow – I’m excited to see their reaction!

 

You save the world because you love it, right? And you love it because of what you’ve come to know. You love seeing the stars at night, you love how animals look and act, you love pristine environments, you love taking a hike up a mountain, and you love walking on the beach with a beautiful clear ocean. These things trigger our sense of beauty, inspiration, peace, and connection with the Earth or a divinity, and most of us use nature at one time or another to get those feelings.

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